What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years Nick Shell

It was March 6, 2013 that I accidently decided to become a vegan. Wow, that was a quick 2 years!

In hindsight, I definitely went through a self-imposed, self-advertised, and awkward public transition during the first couple of months that followed. You could say I may have been a little too zealous about my lifestyle change at first; on Facebook, in particular.

Since then, I have grown up; not only in how much more reserved I’ve become on Facebook in general, but also how I communicate regarding stories about my vegan lifestyle.

Over the past 2 years, I’ve learned to become more inviting (and less bold) when it comes to sharing about it all.

It doesn’t help, as I’ve recently learned, that I have a “D” personality; according to the DISC personality test. In other words, I have the most aggressive personality, so I am learning to control how my passion comes across to others.

At first, I was so eager to prove the vegan lifestyle to the entire world.

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years

These days, I simply want to be known as the token go-to vegan in everyone’s social circle. I’m not eager to convert anyone. I’m just simply here to offer information to anyone suffering from chronic sinusitis and/or dyshidrosis (eczema); both of which I am cured of now that I discovered this lifestyle.

For example, being a vegan for 2 years has taught me a simple concept: Mucus in, mucus out.

No one wants to think about this, but ultimately, both milk and eggs contain a certain amount of mucus, from a foreign species.

When a human ingests that mucus (which is a product of the endocrine system, which truly is disgusting when you consider what else the endocrine system is responsible for), it can definitely have negative effects; as mucus itself is a defense mechanism the body to uses to fight off foreign substances.

Therefore, roughly 20% of the American population has chronic sinus and allergy issues (like I did for 22 years). According to my theory here, it’s because they are ingesting the foreign-fighting mucus of a foreign species.

This is not the sort of thing I openly talk about on Facebook, like I did at first. Instead, I reserve it for open-minded/curious people who care enough to actually read an entire post like this.

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years

In addition to learning to be more reserved in my communication about it, another thing I’ve learned is how my psychology has evolved.

I see now that my relationship with food has transitioned from an emotional relationship to a functional relationship.

Well, obviously I’ve survived the past 2 years without eating any animal products (eggs, dairy, meat, etc.). Granted, I had already been a vegetarian for more than a year before my vegan conversion, and had been kosher (no pork or shellfish, etc.) for several years before that.

While some people have assumed it must take extra discipline to live my life this way, I actually believe the indirect opposite is true:

I don’t have the discipline it takes to only say “yes” in moderation to certain foods. But if the rule is consistent, that I can never have certain things (anything that registers 1% of my daily cholesterol or greater), then it actually takes the temptation away.

In the past 2 years, by default, I’ve learned the importance of getting all my necessary nutrition from 6 things: vegetables, fruits, grains, beans, nuts, and seeds.

I’m happy. I’m never hungry. I eat all the time. It works for me.

If you have any questions, I am happy to answer. I want to be known has the friendliest, least annoying, most helpful vegan you know.

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years

You might also enjoy these other vegan-themed posts I’ve done as well:

Dairy And Egg Free Testimonials: Nick Shell- A Year And A Half Later

I Survived A Year Of Being A Vegan, Part 1

I Survived A Year Of Being A Vegan, Part 2

How To Stay Fuller But Eat Healthier This Year (And Still Eat Meat): A Starter Plan

Ask A Vegan Anything: Is Dairy Related To Allergies And Sinus Problems?

Ask A Vegan Anything: “Where Do You Get Your Vitamin B12?”

Ask A Vegan Anything: Here’s Your Chance

How To Have A Vegan, Vegetarian, Kosher Or Plant-Based Christmas

Vegan Friendly Review Of Atlanta, Georgia

Vegan Friendly Review Of Ponte Vedra Inn And Club At Pompano Beach, FL

Vegan Friendly Review Of Squaw Valley, Lake Tahoe

Vegan Review Of The Farm House In Downtown Nashville

Vegan Recipe Review: Quinoa And Pinto Bean Sloppy Joes

Review Of Dandies Vegan Marshmallows By Chicago Vegan Foods

5 Reasons Your Facebook Friends Are Going Vegan

Dairy And Egg Free Testimonials: Ben Wilder, 6 Months Later

Banana Oatmush; The Real Breakfast of Champions (Contains Cinnamon and Hemp Seed)

I invented the nation’s most healthiest, most alive, most convenient, least expensive breakfast, and it’s completely non-processed.  The best part is, I can’t make a profit off of it at all.  You have to make it yourself.  That’s how you know it’s good.

We know that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but it’s also one of the most difficult to pull off consistently and still be healthy.  Because after eliminating the option of the quick and easy (and deadly) fast food options, what is there that is inexpensive and fiber-packed enough to keep a person full?  And most importantly, what breakfast food is there that has no added sugar, essentially no fat, improves digestion, is easy to make, and actually tastes really good?

Oatmush.  I will share it with you.

Start with a half a cup of rolled oats (make sure that rolled oats are the only ingredient; no sugar, salt, dehydrated fruit, evaporated cane juice, etc).  Sometimes I use Publix store brand that costs about $2 for 32 oz. canister (13 servings); currently I’m using Bob’s Red Mill Extra Thick Rolled Oats that I bought from Whole Foods for just a dollar more:

3.5g fat (0.5 saturated, 0 trans), 1g sugar, 7g protein, 5 g dietary fiber

Just pour the oats in an empty coffee mug, then pour in hot water until the water is about ¼ inch above the top of the oats.  Then grab a banana:

0g fat, 21g sugar (though it doesn’t count against you when eaten in its whole, natural form, but fruit juice does because it has been separated from the fiber of the fruit), 1g protein, 4g dietary fiber

Now with a fork, set the tip of the banana on the edge of the coffee mug, cutting the banana into slices that fall on top of the oatmeal.  Then with the fork, mash the banana slices into oatmeal for a few seconds, like mashing a potato.

By this point, the Oatmush may not be as hot as the oatmeal you’re used to eating, so that means you may need to find hotter water to begin with.  Don’t reheat the Oatmush in the microwave; that “kills” the life in it.  At least 55% of the food we eat in a day needs to be alive.  Live food helps our bodies fight off cancers and diseases (fruits, vegetables, grains, seeds, and nuts in their whole form); dead food doesn’t (meat, processed food, etc.).

If you want to keep things simple, then you’re done.  Enjoy your Oatmush.

However, if you’d like to add more flavor and nutrition to your Oatmush, here’s how I do it.  Mix in about a half a tablespoon of cinnamon (loaded with antioxidants).  Next, get your hands on some hemp seed, found in your nearest Whole Foods.  I use Nutiva’s Organic Shelled Hempseed from the refrigerated section of the store.

Hemp seed is extremely healthy and a major part of a healthy, daily diet:

13.5 g fat (1g saturated, 0g trans), 1g sugar, 11g protein, 1g dietary fiber

It contains more fatty acids than any other nut or seed found in nature (which is a very good thing).  Hempseed contains all 9 essential amino acids and is high in phytonutrients, which support and protect the health of our body’s immunity, bloodstream, cells, tissues, organs, and mitochondria (our body’s “life cells”).

*Flax seed can be substituted in place of hemp seed, which is comparible in nutrition but not equal.

So every morning now, I start off with a good healthy cup of Oatmush.  Complete with hempseed, here is the unofficial complete nutritional value:

17g fat (the good kind), 1.5g saturated fat, Og trans fat, 24g sugar (the good kind), 19g protein, 10g dietary fiber

And that’s with nothing man-made or processed.  A completely alive breakfast.  The best part of it is, I can’t sell you Oatmush.  It’s not a marketable product.  Because if it was, it would have to come in a bag or box and the bananas would have to be dehydrated.  No one can sell you Oatmush.  You have to make it yourself.  And that’s another sign that it’s really good for you.

It’s really quick and easy to make.  Only takes me about one minute, literally. And I dare the entire world to find a healthier, more convenient, less expensive breakfast that is completely alive and not processed in any way.

…I’m waiting.

Oh, and, you’re welcome.  For my secret recipe, that is:

 

Nick Shell’s Famous “Oatmush”

½ cup of rolled oats

1/3 cup of hot water

1 banana

½ tablespoon of cinnamon

3 tablespoons of hemp seed