Jill Shell’s Favorite Year-Round Vegan/Vegetarian Chili Recipe: Family Friendly (Mommy) Blog

As promised, I write today to share with you my scrumptious recipe for some vegan/vegetarian chili.  I mentioned before that I look for recipes that are quick and simple, but I forgot to mention that I really try to make an effort to make things healthy and add in veggies where I can (because, let’s face it, I am horrible at eating veggies and fruits throughout the day . . . even though I am a vegetarian).

Jill Shell's Favorite Year-Round Vegan/Vegetarian Chili Recipe: Family Friendly (Mommy) Blog

In addition to this, I am budget conscious and try to keep that into consideration when preparing meals.  I have to admit that we do tend to shop at Whole Foods and try to purchase organic when feasible, but I mostly buy produce that is on sale (for example, if I need tomatoes, I look for the cheapest organic ones that I can get and buy those) and we often choose the Whole Foods 365 brand over the others as it is more budget friendly for our pocket books.

A few disclaimers before we begin:

·         I am not a perfectionist, so often times I have slightly different amounts of ingredients (I sometimes throw in additional ingredients that are in the fridge that need to be used up).

·         This recipe is adapted from multiple chili recipes we have used in the past so it has not been directly taken from any particular website or cook book.

·         You can expect that this recipe yields about 6 adult-sized bowls of chili.  Need more?  Just double the recipe.  (If you are making this for more than 2 adults and a small child, definitely double the recipe.)

To start, I want to give you the shopping/ingredient list that you will need to make this dish.  I would also like to preface this post by saying, if you like meat in your chili, go ahead and prepare your meat as you would normally and add it to the dish.  Or if you are vegetarian and not vegan, feel free to top off your chili in the end with some cheese or sour cream.  I’m not biased; I just want you to enjoy a good bowl of chili!

Ingredients:

1 medium onion, chopped

3-4 carrots, chopped

1-2 bell peppers (you can use any color or do a combo of each), chopped

1 can of tomatoes (diced w/chilis) or 1-2 small, freshly diced tomatoes & 1 small can of tomato sauce

2 cans of 365 Ranchero Beans

1-1 ½ teaspoons chili powder

1-1 ½ teaspoons cumin

1-1 ½ teaspoons oregano

Salt and Cracked pepper

½  box of 365 Cavatelli Pasta Shells

(Vegan) Butter

Jill Shell's Favorite Year-Round Vegan/Vegetarian Chili Recipe: Family Friendly (Mommy) Blog

Now that we have the ingredients set aside, let’s get to putting this dish together.  I use my food processor to chop my onion, carrots and bell peppers, but if you don’t have one or prefer to cut by hand, I would chop everything into really small pieces (a.k.a. dice ‘em).  As you prepare the veggies, you can just throw them into the crock pot.

Next, I add my cans of chili and tomatoes (if you are chopping fresh tomatoes, I dice them into small chunks for a thicker consistency).

Then add your seasonings: chili powder, cumin, oregano, a splash of salt and a few cracks of pepper.

Stir well and set your crock pot to High.  You can leave the chili in there for about 4-5 hours to cook and occasionally, I come back to stir and let the savory aromas fill the house.

Alternatively, if you are afraid of using crock pots or don’t have the time to deal with it, you can easily prepare this on the stove.  I must admit that I ran out of time this weekend to prepare it in the crock pot and threw this together on the stove.  To prepare on the stove, start by heating a tablespoon or two of olive oil in a pot and then add the onions.  Sautee the onions for a few minutes, then add the carrots and bell peppers.  Sprinkle a little salt and pepper on these sautéing veggies and after a few minutes, toss in the beans and tomatoes.  Follow that up with the spices and let it stew at a low-medium heat for about 30 minutes.  It’s that easy and whether you use a crock pot or a pot on the stove, the chili is delicious.

About 20 minutes before we serve, I put on a pot of water and boil our pasta shells until they are al dente (perfect . . . which for us means, really soft).

When the chili and pasta shells are ready, we each grab a bowl and begin by spooning the shells into our bowl (I usually put in a few spoonfuls to cover about 1/8-1/4 of the bottom of the bowl).  Now please do not miss this next step . . . grab the butter (we use the vegan Earth Balance brand, but whatever brand you have in the house, be sure to use) and add a teaspoon full, then mix it around so that it melts amongst your shells.  Ladle as much chili as you like on top of the noodles for the perfect bowl of chili.

To top it off, you can add whatever fixings you like such as cheese, sour cream, chives, or whatever floats your boat.  On occasion, I like to add cheese, but most nights I enjoy it as it is.  I don’t know what it is, but there’s something about the melted butter over the noodles mixed with the goodness of the chili that is really unbeatable.

And that’s how you make an easy vegan/vegetarian chili dish.

Enjoy!


Source: PartSelect.com

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years Nick Shell

It was March 6, 2013 that I accidently decided to become a vegan. Wow, that was a quick 2 years!

In hindsight, I definitely went through a self-imposed, self-advertised, and awkward public transition during the first couple of months that followed. You could say I may have been a little too zealous about my lifestyle change at first; on Facebook, in particular.

Since then, I have grown up; not only in how much more reserved I’ve become on Facebook in general, but also how I communicate regarding stories about my vegan lifestyle.

Over the past 2 years, I’ve learned to become more inviting (and less bold) when it comes to sharing about it all.

It doesn’t help, as I’ve recently learned, that I have a “D” personality; according to the DISC personality test. In other words, I have the most aggressive personality, so I am learning to control how my passion comes across to others.

At first, I was so eager to prove the vegan lifestyle to the entire world.

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years

These days, I simply want to be known as the token go-to vegan in everyone’s social circle. I’m not eager to convert anyone. I’m just simply here to offer information to anyone suffering from chronic sinusitis and/or dyshidrosis (eczema); both of which I am cured of now that I discovered this lifestyle.

For example, being a vegan for 2 years has taught me a simple concept: Mucus in, mucus out.

No one wants to think about this, but ultimately, both milk and eggs contain a certain amount of mucus, from a foreign species.

When a human ingests that mucus (which is a product of the endocrine system, which truly is disgusting when you consider what else the endocrine system is responsible for), it can definitely have negative effects; as mucus itself is a defense mechanism the body to uses to fight off foreign substances.

Therefore, roughly 20% of the American population has chronic sinus and allergy issues (like I did for 22 years). According to my theory here, it’s because they are ingesting the foreign-fighting mucus of a foreign species.

This is not the sort of thing I openly talk about on Facebook, like I did at first. Instead, I reserve it for open-minded/curious people who care enough to actually read an entire post like this.

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years

In addition to learning to be more reserved in my communication about it, another thing I’ve learned is how my psychology has evolved.

I see now that my relationship with food has transitioned from an emotional relationship to a functional relationship.

Well, obviously I’ve survived the past 2 years without eating any animal products (eggs, dairy, meat, etc.). Granted, I had already been a vegetarian for more than a year before my vegan conversion, and had been kosher (no pork or shellfish, etc.) for several years before that.

While some people have assumed it must take extra discipline to live my life this way, I actually believe the indirect opposite is true:

I don’t have the discipline it takes to only say “yes” in moderation to certain foods. But if the rule is consistent, that I can never have certain things (anything that registers 1% of my daily cholesterol or greater), then it actually takes the temptation away.

In the past 2 years, by default, I’ve learned the importance of getting all my necessary nutrition from 6 things: vegetables, fruits, grains, beans, nuts, and seeds.

I’m happy. I’m never hungry. I eat all the time. It works for me.

If you have any questions, I am happy to answer. I want to be known has the friendliest, least annoying, most helpful vegan you know.

What I’ve Learned From Being A Vegan For The Past 2 Years

You might also enjoy these other vegan-themed posts I’ve done as well:

Dairy And Egg Free Testimonials: Nick Shell- A Year And A Half Later

I Survived A Year Of Being A Vegan, Part 1

I Survived A Year Of Being A Vegan, Part 2

How To Stay Fuller But Eat Healthier This Year (And Still Eat Meat): A Starter Plan

Ask A Vegan Anything: Is Dairy Related To Allergies And Sinus Problems?

Ask A Vegan Anything: “Where Do You Get Your Vitamin B12?”

Ask A Vegan Anything: Here’s Your Chance

How To Have A Vegan, Vegetarian, Kosher Or Plant-Based Christmas

Vegan Friendly Review Of Atlanta, Georgia

Vegan Friendly Review Of Ponte Vedra Inn And Club At Pompano Beach, FL

Vegan Friendly Review Of Squaw Valley, Lake Tahoe

Vegan Review Of The Farm House In Downtown Nashville

Vegan Recipe Review: Quinoa And Pinto Bean Sloppy Joes

Review Of Dandies Vegan Marshmallows By Chicago Vegan Foods

5 Reasons Your Facebook Friends Are Going Vegan

Dairy And Egg Free Testimonials: Ben Wilder, 6 Months Later

healthnutshell: Ezekiel Bread Just Got Cool All of the Sudden

What would Jesus eat?

There was a time in history, circa 2006, when all that Food for Life brand’s Ezekiel 4:9 bread was to me was just a $5 loaf of bread in the refrigerated section at Wild Oats/Whole Foods.  A loaf of bread for people who wanted to spend five bucks.  But now, I want to spend five bucks on a loaf of bread.  Not because I have more money than before, but because I have awareness of the difference it makes to my health.

It’s safe to say that “Ezekiel Bread” (as most people have nicknamed it) is the only American food product on the edge of the mainstream market that 1) has an Old Testament prophet’s name in the brand, 2) uses an ancient Jewish recipe, AND #) has Bible scripture on the package:

Ezekiel chapter 4, verse 9- “Also take wheat, barley, beans, lentils, millet, and spelt, and put them into one vessel and make bread of them.”

What’s the main thing that sets Ezekiel Bread apart from the rest of the bread out on the market?  It’s not made with flour.  Instead, it’s made with freshly sprouted, certified organically grown grains.  Therefore, it’s alive.  And that significantly increases its valuable nutrients for the body’s consumption.

The more living things we eat, the healthier we are.  That’s why we’re supposed to eat 2 to 4 servings of fruit and 3 to 5 of vegetables. Those living cells we eat help keep our own cells alive and well, helping our immune system to fight sickness, disease, and cancer.

Plus, Ezekiel Bread is low glycemic which means it’s diabetic friendly, and high in fiber which means it’s good for preventing cancer and heart disease.

Most bread in the world is processed.  Machines grind up the ingredients, then sugar is added along with preservatives.  But not our heavenly Ezekiel Bread.  It’s the only kind of bread I buy now. 

Of course Weight Watchers as well as Jillian Michaels from The Biggest Loser obviously feel the same way, since they recommend Ezekiel Bread in their programs.  I’m not sure if they are paid anything to endorse the product, but I know I definitely am not.  That’s how you know it’s a good product, when people advertise a product for free.

http://www.foodforlife.com/