Peanuts Emmy Honored Collection: 11 Episode, 2 Disc Set

Peanuts Emmy Honored Collection: 11 Episode, 2 Disc Set

I have been waiting for quite a while for my nearly 5 year-old son and me to sit down and watch the new Ninja Turtles movie. He was a bit too young to see it when it came out in the theatre, but now that it’s available on Netflix streaming, I’ve been hyping it up to him.

However, we’ve still yet to watch it…

That’s because the same week Ninja Turtles hit Netflix streaming, we received the Peanuts Emmy Honored Collection in our mailbox, to review here on Family Friendly Daddy Blog.

With that being said, every night before bedtime, we’ve sat down as a family and watched an episode of Peanuts. This set contains more than 4 hours (265 minutes) of Charlie Brown and his friends.

I would have to say our favorite episode is “It’s Magic, Charlie Brown.” Produced the same year my wife and I were born, 1981, this hilarious episode features Snoopy trying out his newly acquired “magic tricks” on all the kids.

Peanuts Emmy Honored Collection: 11 Episode, 2 Disc Set

When Snoopy turns Charlie Brown invisible and but is unable to turn him back, Snoopy desperately tries to find ways to remedy the situation; including covering him in mud, as well as wrapping him up in a sheet and a necktie.

The most memorable episode is “Why, Charlie Brown, Why?” from 1990. Linus befriends a girl named Janice, who he soon discovers has leukemia.

It’s so heartfelt to watch Linus care for her, visit her in the hospital, comfort her as she loses her hair, defends her against a bully who teased her, and celebrate with her when she recovers from her cancer.

Needless to say, my son has thoroughly enjoyed watching Peanuts every night. And with a few more episodes left to go, we’ve still yet to watch the new Ninja Turtles movie.

PEANUTS: EMMY® HONORED COLLECTION

A COLLECTION SHOWCASING 11 CELEBRATED PEANUTS SPECIALS

IS SET FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 15, 2015

FROM WARNER BROS. HOME ENTERTAINMENT

 

Two-Disc Collection Features Over Four Hours of Peanuts Specials

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May You Live In Interesting Times

February 19, 2013 at 10:55 pm , by 

2 years, 3 months.

Dear Jack,

My biggest fear in life is not of public speaking or of heights; it’s that I’ll have to be bored for more than 30 minutes. Yes, that’s a giveaway sign that I’m part of Generation Y.

However, as long as I have you around, I don’t think that being bored will be a problem.

The clock does not generally seem to slow down when I am with you. You keep life interesting in your silly, weird, and challenging ways.

This morning I spent ten minutes wrestling you as you resisted me getting you dressed. I was actually sweating a little bit by the time we finally headed out the door. Seriously, you put up quite a fight.

While I generally don’t look forward to having to pin you down to get you dressed, it’s little things like that that keep life interesting.

I mean, the normal way to leave for work in the morning wouldn’t include such a physical and psychological challenge. But with you, it just might.

On the lighter side, your ideas of fun and passing time are much more different than mine.

For example, every night after your bath, you like to run into your closet and find a new treasure to carry to bed. Last night, it was a cow print cloth diaper.

This is especially funny to me because you never really wore your cloth diapers in the first place. But because you find entertainment in discovering random items stored in your closet, you selected the cow print cloth diaper.

I could tell you were slightly disappointed that your choice wasn’t as exciting as the one from the night before, which was one of your baby monitor speakers.

Even still, you committed to it. You did your best to convince yourself that you actually wanted to sleep with a cow print cloth diaper.

My life is not boring, thanks to you. Needless to say, I live in interesting times.

 

Love,

Daddy

 

 

Misadventures in Daycare: Summer of 1987

Three months in the Alabama Slammer.

The smell of burnt scrambled eggs is so distinct. Somehow the cooks at my summer daycare in 1987 managed to consistently make sure breakfast was less than gourmet quality. For me at age six, I treated daycare like prison. I was forced to be there. I was made to sleep on a cot for an hour even though I wasn’t tired. I had to watch TV shows I didn’t want to see, like Reading Rainbow marathons. For the most part, I kept my head down and stayed out of everybody’s business. I wasn’t there to make friends. I was there to serve my time and move on.

At least my partner in crime was there with me. My sister Dana, being 3 years younger than me, was with a different age group for most of the day. But from 2 to 3 o’clock all the kids were in the same room for nap time. The entire floor was covered with grungy green army cots we had to balance on and pretend like we were all sleeping. Baffled by all these strange kids around me who for some reason actually seemed to enjoy being there, the only person I would talk to was my sister. Not only was she easy to talk to (she was 3 at the time) but she thought I was funny.

One day during nap time on the cot next to hers, I held up my hand near her face, waving hello. Then I pulled in three of my fingers to my palm to make a gun. Next I pulled in my thumb and pointer finger to make a fist. She was impressed with my ability to wave, make a gun, then a fist with the same hand in a matter of seconds. A woman in charge saw me do it and said in front of everyone, “Nick, put your hand down and stop bothering your sister.” I didn’t care enough to explain that she liked it and so stood convicted of my new crime.

By the end of the summer though, a wonderful event occurred. A prospective parent brought their child in to visit the place, all dressed up like they were from Connecticut or something. While giving the tour, one of the ladies in charge of the place showed the parent and child where the restroom was.

She opened the door only to find there was a boy sitting down on the toilet with his shorts around his ankles. He didn’t lock the door and therefore was exposed to the parent, child, and everyone facing that side of the room. It was great. That made my summer at Lad & Lassie Day Care worth the while.

Classic.