Fuller House Recaps- S1: E5 “Mad Max”

Fuller House Recaps- S1: E5 “Mad Max”

In the canon of the first season of Fuller House, this episode ultimately feels like a filler episode, with the exception of one major revelation:

Stephanie explains to DJ, at the end of the episode, that she is unable to have children.

While I’m sure the writers of Fuller House want the audience to focus the majority of their attention of who DJ will end up with, I don’t.

Instead, I’m sort of obsessed with the fact that the writers have made such a conscious effort to paint Stephanie as the ultimate middle child.

Here she is at age 34, without a real job, without a family of her own, and without any real direction in her life.

Now on top of that, she has recently find out that even when she does settle down and start a family of her own, she can’t have her own biological children.

This plot line is crucial to the character of Stephanie finally beginning to start acting her age. She is now realizing that by infusing herself more fully in to DJ’s family, she can begin to have a sense of being needed by a family again.

To further illustrate this, Stephanie helps “Mad Max” gain confidence by letting him practice his song to Stephanie’s audience, via her cell phone.

This is also the episode where there’s a classic misunderstanding when Ramona flushes a baby diaper down the toilet, causing DJ to believe that a guy who Kimmy set her up with online is actually the plumber. From there, innuendos follow to help ensure we know that Fuller House is not a G-rated show.

Please mark my word. The aspect of Fuller House that is the most intriguing is not DJ, but instead Stephanie.

For this show to really go somewhere, we will have to see Stephanie truly grow into her age; because truly, right now, she’s about a decade behind.

She’s not the typical 34 year-old. Leave it to Stephanie’s family to change that.

Also, here’s my own video version of this recap as well:

What Kind of TV Parents are We? (Infographic Included)

Jason-Maggie-Seaver-growing-pains-5110661-402-512

My wife and I have talked before about which TV parents we are most similar to. We quickly decided that Jason and Maggie Seaver, of the 1980s sitcom Growing Pains (1985-1992), best represent us.

It seems like most TV sitcoms of the 1980s revolved around some kind of amendment to the traditional nuclear family.

Like a wise-cracking alien joining the Tanner house on Alf. Or Uncle Jesse and Joey joining the Tanner House on Full House. And don’t forget how neighbor Steve Urkle basically lived with the Winslows.

But with Growing Pains, there was a nuclear family in which the parents loved each other, and unlike most sitcoms since the 1980s, the dad wasn’t an idiot.

Plus, there was no outsider who is adopted into the family; unless you count the final season in which Leonardo DiCaprio joined the cast, but I figure most of us had stopped watching by that point.

The parents were intelligent, hard-working, and sensitive to the children’s psychological needs. Though that sounds like a pretty normal thing to feature on a family sitcom, it’s not.

Writers on sitcoms often can’t handle a happily married couple with kids. If nothing else, the writers have to kill off one of the parents.

Danny Tanner’s wife died after a drunk driver hit her, on Full House.

Then DJ’s husband died while fighting fires, on Fuller House.

And then if both parents are still alive, the dad is by default, an idiot: Homer Simpson on The Simpsons, Al Bundy on Married with Children, Carl Winslow on Family Matters, Tim Allen on Home Improvement

I would actually argue that the Seavers were actually the most normal, life-like family in the past 30 years, in a sitcom. That’s the simple reason that I believe that Jason Seaver best represents me as a TV dad, and Maggie Seaver represents my wife.

Below is a related flow-chart asking, “Which T.V. Mom are you?”

(Because I fully recognize that the majority of the readers of my blog are not male, but instead female.)

Thanks to Berries.com for this graphic.

Which TV Mom Are You?

Fuller House Recaps: Renewed for a 2nd Season

Fuller House Recaps: Renewed for a 2nd Season

Just a few days after the 1st season of Fuller House was released on Netflix, it was announced that a 2nd season has been ordered.

Therefore, that means there will also be a 2nd season of Fuller House Recaps. I look forward to continuing to be your host and guide not just through the rest of this first season, but the next one as well.

Here’s my video recap of this historic event:

I imagine that Season 2 will answer some of our unanswered questions:

“Why does Uncle Joey wear a wedding ring but never mention his wife or bring her to the house?”

“What about Danny’s wife? We briefly saw her kiss Danny, but I don’t believe we even got a name.”

“Who will DJ choose: Steve or Matt?”

Plus, is there a chance that Mary Kate or Ashley will reprise the role of Michelle? (Either one will do; we don’t have to have both.)

And will Stephanie, age 34, finally start acting like she’s 34?

The fact that Fuller House was so quickly renewed apparently tells us something about the money being made from the show.

Obviously, Netflix must have greatly benefited from the number of viewers that turned out to watch. They realized that whether or not the critics liked the show was irrelevant; what matters is that it’s a popular show.

In other words, the free market decided to make Fuller House so popular it would actually be financially irresponsible to not make a  2nd season.

Ultimately, the whole concept is pretty weird: A feel-good family sitcom from 1987 is resurrected, not on a major TV network, but on a streaming service people can watch anytime.

It was a plan just crazy enough to work. And even if we are mainly here just for the curiosity side of it, we still are indeed coming back.

Good job, free market. Good job, 1980s kids. Good job, Netflix.

Fuller House Recaps- S1: E4, “The Not-So-Great Escape”

Fuller House Recaps- S1: E4, “The Not-So-Great Escape”e-guide-list

In the 4th episode of Fuller House, we are officially introduced to DJ’s veterinarian clinic, as DJ’s son Max is given the responsibility of choosing which spawn of Comet he wants.

The main plot line involves Jackson and Ramona getting into trouble together at school, and therefore, both being suspended; after Jackson makes a (smoke producing?) volcano underneath the smoke alarm in an effort to cause a diversion to help Ramona escape (?) from school.

I find that concept difficult to follow, but it takes even more imagination to figure out how Stephanie and DJ’s boys found so much tomato soup to soak in after the skunk sprayed them.

And speaking of Stephanie, my disappointment for her character (age 34) grows after learning that her career as a DJ (?!) isn’t even paying off: She has a collection of maxed out credit cards, causing her to be unable to pay her $18 coffee bill.

From there, a misunderstanding or two causes Stephanie to pretend to be a single mom in order to impress a guy at the coffee shop.

We also see DJ parenting Kimmy on how to parent, after they initially discipline their children much differently after “the not-so-great-escape”.

This episode is heavy on character development, as we see the character similarities between Jackson and Ramona (yearning 7th graders), as well as Stephanie and Kimmy (adults who lack self-discipline as well as the ability to efficiently discipline children), contrasted against the “real adult” figure of DJ tanner.

Though by the end of this episode, Kimmy (age 39) shows honest efforts to be an adult, Stephanie (age 34) shows she her character will continue to struggle.

Isn’t it at least a little odd that so early on in this series it is becoming evident this show is about adults who failed to grow up?

Must I remind you about Uncle Joey (age 56) on the episode right before this, leading the kids in trashing the house with slime?

Seriously, it’s a theme: Adults who forgot to grow up since Full House ended in 1995.

And don’t forget to watch my video recap here:

If you would like the full version, watch this one instead:

Fuller House Recaps- S1: E3, “Funner House”

Fuller House Recaps- S1: E3, “Funner House”

In this 3rd episode of Fuller House awkwardly entitled “Funner House”, we see a literally incredible event in which Uncle Joey (who is in his mid 50s) babysits the kids.

Despite apparently getting married (hence the black wedding ring) and moving out of the house many years ago, Joey Gladstone never had kids of his own.

I say this not only because he doesn’t mention any kids if he has them (though he doesn’t mention his wife either), but because he flies in from Las Vegas (to San Francisco) with a mini arsenal fully of wacky summer camp weapons of “family friendly violence” and leads the kids in wrecking the house with slime and other water-based ammunition.

A married man with kids of his own would not encourage such behavior.

And then at the end of the episode, after witnessing DJ, Stephanie, and Kimmy getting accidentally slimed instead of him, he just laughs and walks away.

That is why I call the premise of this episode “literally incredible,” as in, not credible.

Though I do admit I really liked his toilet paper leaf blower.

I suppose I should mention the actual main plot of this episode, which concerns Stephanie and Kimmy taking DJ out for girls’ night.

We see a random opportunity for Stephanie to utilize her skills as a DJ and singer (?!), along with Macy Gray (?!).

The part I liked most about “Funner House” is that we see despite Kimmy soon-to-be-ex-husband there with another woman, there is definitely a spark of hope they may end up back together.

I don’t really care about DJ and Steve getting back together, because that’s obviously inevitable.

But it would be more difficult and I believe more rewarding to see Kimmy and Fernando to get back together; for each other, and for Ramona.

Be sure to watch my video recap as well, here below: