Red Foxes are Majestic, Magical, Medieval Creatures; Especially When It Snows in the South

When people from outside of the South think of the weather down here, my guess is they probably assume we hardly ever get snow. And while our precipitation amount doesn’t compare to New England or the Midwest, every year I’ve been alive it’s snowed at least once during the winter season. (It even snowed once in April of 1988; I got out of school early that day).

And yes, it only takes an inch or two to shut down the whole town because most cities only own one snow plow, if that. Plus we’re not used to driving in it. There’s no shame in that.

Yesterday as I walked through Aspen Grove Park to Border’s as I do every day during my lunch break, I noticed that my footprints were the only ones in the snow. This mental image popped in my head of a Red Fox. Evidently I associate Red Foxes with snow and woods.

A little while later as I walked back through the park to my office, I saw animal footprints I wasn’t familiar with. I was used to seeing people walk their dogs there, surrounded by all the squirrels on their apparent cocaine highs. So I assumed these were raccoon prints.

About 45 minutes later back at my desk, one of my co-workers who was on the phone at the time, started pointing out the floor-to-ceiling windows we have as walls in our office. It was a big Red Fox. Less than a 100 feet away. Coming from the park I just got back from, journeying all the way around the building with its glass walls.

There is just something truly mesmerizing about a Red Fox. It’s so rare to see one in real life, especially right around the corner from a Starbucks. Watching that fox make his way around our office made me feel like I was in a magical medieval movie like The Princess Bride or something. Watching a fox trot through the snow in a business development is enchanting.

I can’t stop thinking about that beautiful, rare, red creature. I want to tame it. Make it my loyal pet. Man’s best friend. The Red Fox.

In fact, I’m having trouble thinking of a more beautiful animal in this whole world. Magnificent and majestic. It’s no coincidence that Red Foxes have been a part of folklore for centuries.

And in more modern culture like the recent movie, Fantastic Mr. Fox. And the 1973 Walt Disney Robin Hood cartoon (where Red Foxes took the place of people). And Star Fox for N64. And in the ‘80’s cartoon show, David the Gnome, he rode on Swift the Fox, who was always getting a splinter in his paw.

Looking at a Red Fox in real life can be confusing. Am I actually looking at a real fox or is it an anthropomorphic clone that escaped from Chuck E. Cheese’s? Yes, foxes are that awesome.

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6 thoughts on “Red Foxes are Majestic, Magical, Medieval Creatures; Especially When It Snows in the South

  1. I love the red fox too!They have proven in siberia/russia that a fox can be tamed and mans best-friend!Ive never understood fox hunting???A bunch of dogs chasing one dog???Grown men on horseback shooting at another dog!

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  2. I have found foxes fascinating since 1996 (Thanks tremendously ,Richard Scarry!) by the way,Robin Hood(the 1973 animated Disney film) is my third all time favorite movie( Iwas 8 years old that year) we are the Vulpine !(that’s for Ralf and Florian)

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  3. Thats a rare fox up the top a breed with the racoon dog and a black fox creates a silver fox if they breed with a red fox you get the black legs and tail xxx

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  4. Hi Daddy Blog, I love the foxes they are lovely creatures. I also have links to a genuine Robin Hood historical figure called Turner ‘Longbow’ Harvey, from Somerset England, whom features in my new book called TURNER TREES available at online book stores and Kindle. It’s all good family history.
    Best Wishes.

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