Motivational Sylvester Stallone Quotes that I Will Pass on to My Kids: Choosing the Victor Mindset over the Victim Mentality

Motivational Sylvester Stallone Quotes That I Will Pass on to My Kids: Choosing the Victor Mindset over the Victim Mentality

In the past few days, I have watched 2 movies written by and starring Sylvester Stallone that have quotes which ideologically line up with what I believe and want to install in my children.

The first is featured in the beginning of Rocky 3 (filmed the year I was born in 1981 and released the following year in 1982). It’s my favorite of the Rocky series.

Rocky tells his victim-mentality brother-in-law, “Nobody owes nobody nothing! You owe yourself.”

A few months back, I wrote about how I believe the world doesn’t owe me anything; not even the government. Stallone adds to that, by clarifying that we as individuals owe it to ourselves to try to earn what we think we are worth.

Five years later in 1987, Stallone made an accidentally hilarious movie in which he plays an arm wrestling truck driver who lifts weights on a pulley contraption in the truck while he drives: Over the Top.

He tells his estranged son on a couple different occasions, “The world meets nobody halfway.”

Motivational Sylvester Stallone Quotes That I Will Pass on to My Kids: Choosing the Victor Mindset over the Victim Mentality

Stallone again shares his philosophy, in which I endorse, that if you leave it up to someone else for your own happiness and/or fulfillment, you will ultimately be disappointed most of the time.

As part of our own family creed and our household, we simply do not allow the victim mentality (also known as the scarcity mindset), where we are quick to blame, criticize, and expect other members of society to take care us.

Instead, we believe in the victor mindset (also known as abundance consciousness), where we are quick to take responsibility for own decisions and actions, while proactively being willing to get ahead in life by choosing to do the things that most of society is not willing to do.

That’s a major principle taught in one of my favorite books, Rich Dad, Poor Dad; by Robert Kiyosaki.

It’s a matter of working both hard and smart. I feel so much of my job as a parent is to teach my children how to think creatively and independently.

I believe it’s not enough to think outside the box… because, why must we be boxed in to begin with?

Find a way to remove the box, then proceed.

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